Weather

My Archives

Calendar

November 2014
S M T W T F S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

ClustrMaps

Login

Дети с инвалидностью…

Share this:

…Друг прислал ссылку…

Dasha Daunis is a lively 15-year-old who loves animals. She talks with her mother, Anastasia, about a recent trip to the circus, where they saw her favorite, bears.

Dasha was born with Down syndrome, and Anastasia says the doctors at the hospital told her that her baby would never thrive.

“Everyone was saying, the most reasonable decision is to abandon the child, because it’s a cross you’ll have to bear all your life,” she recalls. “This child will never even understand that you are its father and mother. And your friends and your family will turn away from you.”

Anastasia says she couldn’t bear to leave her child behind, and after more than a year, she brought Dasha home from the orphanage. She never regretted her decision.

Instead, she thinks the doctors who advised her were in need of help and better information themselves.

But this Russian habit of placing disabled children in orphanages has changed little over the years, according to a new report highlighting problems with Russia’s treatment of disabled kids.

Human Rights Watch, the U.S.-based group, says that nearly 30 percent of Russian children with disabilities live in state orphanages.

“We do believe that people are still being advised to institutionalize their children,” says Andrea Mazzarino, a researcher at Human Rights Watch, which recently released its report. “We spoke with several parents who heard that advice within the past two years in Moscow alone.”

Instances Of Poor Treatment

Mazzarino says that once disabled children are consigned to state orphanages, there’s little chance that they’ll be given the attention needed to thrive. In many cases, she says, they face ill treatment.

“We visited 10 institutions across Russia, and in the vast majority, we either heard about, or we witnessed firsthand, severe forms of violence and neglect,” she says, including children being tied up and sedated, or beaten, or doused with cold water.

She says children with severe disabilities are confined to so-called “lying down” rooms, where they spend their days in cribs, kept in diapers and fed through tubes. Photos from her report show teenagers with the physical development of preschoolers after years of confinement.

Pages: 1 2

Leave a Reply